Adjective Clause



Adjective Clause :



An adjective clause is a group of words. It contains a subject and a predicate of its own and does the work of an Adjective.

1. It's an ill wind that blows nobody any good.
2. Heaven helps those who help themselves.
3. He laughs best who laughs last.

1. that blows nobody any good – Adjective clause - qualifies "wind"

2. Who help themselves - Adjective clause - qualifies 'those'

3. He (who laughs last) laughs best – Who laughs last - Adjective clause - qualifies "He"

An Adverb clause is a group of words. It contains a subject and a predicate of its own and does the work of an adverb.

1. If you eat too much, you will be ill.
2. The army advanced as far as it dared.
3. I shall be where I am.

1. It you eat too much - Adverb clause – modifies “will be”.

2. as it dared - Adverb clause – modifies "advanced"

3. Where I am - Adverb clause - modifies "shall be"

Adjective Clauses

1. Do you know the person who owns that house?
2. John is going to catch the first bus that comes.
3. The coach will move without those who are late.
4. Here is the book you want.
5. He that climbs too high is sure to fall.
6. I remember the house where Tagore was born.
7. The handle of the cup is the pan you hold it by.
8. The chair Mr. Clark stood on looked old and bad.
9. I had never seen him in the temper he was in last week.
10. I prefer chairs that have arms.

Adjective Clause



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