Adjectives and Their Positions in Sentences



Adjectives and Their Positions in Sentences :



Some Adjectives are used attributively.
Some other Adjectives are used predicatively.

Attributive adjective : (of an adjective, noun or phrase) - describing and coming before a noun

In "a major success", "major" is an attributive adjective.
In "the school bus", "school" is an attributive adjective.
"school" is in attributive position - attributively (adverb)

Predicative adjective : (especially of an adjective or phrase) - coming after a verb in - He is alive.

"alive" is a predicative adjective.

An old friend. (here - it means the friend is known for a long time.)
My friend is quite old. (here - it means the friend is old in age.)

An old friend - the adjective 'old' is used attributively - before the noun friend.
My friend is quite old. (here - the adjective 'old' is used predicatively - after the verb 'is.')

It is a live fish. - (Attributive use of the Adjective)
That fish is still alive. (Predicative use of Adjective)
This broadcast comes to you live from Delhi. (Adjective used predicatively)

We say, "It is a nice little house".
But we do not say, "The house is little."
We say, 'The house is small'.

Note that 'mere' and ’sheer' are always used attributively.
He is a mere child. What does it know?
What you say, is, sheer nonsense.

He is a one-eyed man.
'one-eyed' - compound adjective - used attributively
It is not used predicatively.

Adjectives and Their Positions in Sentences



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