Classes of Conjunctions



Classes of Conjunctions :



A Conjunction is a word used for joining and for no other purpose.

A Conjunction is never connected with an Object as a Preposition is.

A Conjunction never qualifies a word as an Adverb does.

It simply joins words or sentences.

Hence the same word can be an Adverb in one place, a Preposition in another or a Conjunction in yet another.

In the following three sentences, the word BEFORE has been used either as an adverb or a Preposition or a Conjunction.

1. I have seen this man before. (Adverb)

2. He lived here before the war. (Preposition)

3. The rain fell before we reached home. (Conjunction)

In the following three sentences, the word BUT has been used either as an adverb or a Preposition or a Conjunction.

1. He is 83 but he still goes walking every day. (Conjunction)

2. There has been nothing but problems since she came. (Preposition)

3. We can but believe that all will improve. (Adverb)

In the following three sentences, the word AFTER has been used either as an adverb or a Preposition or a Conjunction.

1. He went for a swim after dinner. (Preposition)

2. She died on June 6th and was cremated the day after. (Adverb)

3. After you had left, we got a phone call from Ram. (Conjunction)

In the following three sentences, the word AS has been used either as an adverb or a Preposition or a Conjunction.

1. We must go to sleep now as we have to get up early in the morning. (Conjunction)

2. That is a photo of her as a prisoner. (Preposition)

3. His new dog is as black as charcoal. (Adverb)

In the following sentences, the word FOR has been used either as an adverb or a Preposition or a Conjunction.

1. He couldn't even put on his shirt, for he was completely drunk. (Conjunction)

2. His grandchildren book an ambulance for him when he fell sick. (Preposition)

In the following sentences, the word SO has been used either as an adverb or a Preposition or a Conjunction.

1. Her husband had an affair with another girl, so his wife did the same with another man. (Conjunction)

2. She hates her neighbour and so does her father. (Adverb)

3. The rumour was about aliens out to kill the rich man, but that was not so. (Adjective)

Classes of Conjunctions

Conjunctions are sub-divided into two main classes.

Co-ordinating Conjunctions are called so because they join words, phrases or clauses of co-ordinate (that is, of equal) rank.

Subordinating Conjunctions are called so because they join a sub-ordinate or dependent clause to a principal clause (that is…to a clause of higher rank).

RELATED PAGES :



  1. The Conjunction
  2. Conjunctions
  3. A Conjunction
  4. Classes of Conjunctions
  5. Coordinating Conjunctions
  6. Cumulative Coordinating Conjunctions
  7. Alternative Coordinating Conjunctions
  8. Adversative Coordinating Conjunctions
  9. Illative Coordinating Conjunctions
  10. Subordinating Conjunctions
  11. Sentences with Proper Conjunctions
  12. Conjunctions of Purpose
  13. Conjunctions of Comparison


Classes of Conjunctions :



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