Correct Usage of Adverbs



Correct Usage of Adverbs :



If the word or the group of words to be qualified is an Adjective or an Adverb or a Phrase or a Clause, the qualifying Adverb is placed immediately before it.

Adjective or Participle

1. We are half pleased and half sorry.
2. The mango you brought was quite ripe.
3. That box is too heavy for you to lift.

Adverb

1. A snake creeps very silently.
2. He stood far apart from me.
3. He seized my hand rather roughly.

Phrase

1. He arrived long before the time.
2. We sat almost in the shade.
3. He stood just behind me.

Clause

1. Tell me precisely how it happened.
2. I like a mango only when it is ripe.
3. He did this merely because he was ordered to.

There is one exception to the above rule. The word ENOUGH (when it is an Adverb and not an Adjective) is placed after the word it qualifies.

1. Your pay is good enough for your work.
2. He spoke highly enough of what you had done.

If the Verb to be qualified is Intransitive, the qualifying Adverb is placed immediately after it.

1. He lived well and died happily.
2. He laughed heartily at that joke.
3. He spoke foolishly about his own merits.

Adverbs denoting time are an exception to this rule. For the Adverbs always, never, often, sometimes, generally, rarely, merely and seldom are usually placed before and not after the Verb they qualify.

1. He always laughed at a good joke.
2. He never spoke about his own merits.
3. He often came here to see me.
4. He sometimes slept in my house.
5. He merely came to return my book.
6. He seldom stayed with me for long.

But they can be placed after as well as before the Verb TO BE.

1. He is seldom absent.
2. He seldom is absent.

If the Verb to be qualified is Transitive, the qualifying Adverb must not be allowed to separate the Verb and its Object.

The Adverb must therefore be placed either before the Verb or after the Object. But it is more commonly placed after the Object.

1. He bore his losses cheerfully.
2. He did his work patiently till sunset.
3. He briefly explained his meaning.

Sometimes, however, if the Object is qualified by a clause or consists of a good many words, the Adverb may come between the Verb and its Object.

1. He rewarded liberally all those who had served him well.

If the Tense of the Verb is formed by an Auxiliary Verb, the Adverb is generally placed between the Auxiliary Verb and the Principal Verb.

1. The wind has suddenly risen.
2. I have quite forgiven you.
3. Your son will soon return.
4. He is almost dying, I fear.

Similarly, the Negative Adverb NOT is always placed between the Auxiliary Verb and the Principal Verb.

1. We have not seen him since Monday last.
2. I did not know how ill he was.
3. We shall not punish him severely.

RELATED PAGES :



  1. Correct Usage of Nouns
  2. Correct Usage of Pronouns
  3. Correct Usage of Verbs
  4. Correct Usage of The Conjunctions
  5. Correct Usage of The Adverbs - MUCH and VERY
  6. Correct Usage of The Adverbs - LITTLE and A LITTLE
  7. Correct Usage of The Adverbs - YES and NO
  8. Correct Usage of The Adverb - ONLY
  9. Correct Usage of The Adverb - TOO
  10. Correct Usage of The Adverb - ENOUGH
  11. Correct Usage of The Adverb - SINCE
  12. Correct Usage of The Adverb - AGO
  13. Correct Usage of The Adverb - BEFORE
  14. Correct Usage of The Adverb - ALREADY
  15. Correct Usage of The Adverb - THERE
  16. Correct Usage of The Adverb - ELSE
  17. Correct Usage of The Adverb - NEVER
  18. Correct Usage of The Adverb - QUITE
  19. Correct Usage of AT and IN
  20. Correct Usage of WITH and BY
  21. Correct Usage of BETWEEN and AMONG
  22. Correct Usage of BESIDE and BESIDES
  23. Correct Usage of IN and INTO
  24. Correct Usage of IN and WITHIN
  25. Correct Usage of SINCE and FROM


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