Miscellaneous Mistakes in English Grammar



Miscellaneous Mistakes in English Grammar :



Sometimes a single Verb is made to serve two Subjects - which gives rise to errors.

I am eighteen years old and my sister sixteen.

We should rewrite it as…

1. I am eighteen years old and my sister is sixteen.

Two Auxiliaries with One Principal Verb :

Two Auxiliaries can be used with one Principal Verb, only when the form of the Principal Verb is the same for both the Auxiliaries.

1. I never have hurt her feelings and never will.
2. No government can or will ever go against the will of the people.

But we cannot say…

I never have and never will allow such a thing to happen.
I never have and I never will accuse a man falsely.

We must say…

1. I never have allowed and never will allow such a thing to happen.
2. I never have accused and I never will accuse a man falsely.

One Auxiliary with Two Principal Verbs :

It is quite permissible to use only one Auxiliary for the two verbs if the second, were it inserted, would be the same as the first.

1. Ten candidates have passed and six failed.

But we cannot say…

Ten candidates have passed and one failed.

We should rewrite it as…

1. Ten candidates have passed and one has failed.

Verbs Apt to be Confused : Confusing Verbs

Take care not to confuse the following Verbs.

1. The man lay (not laid) down for a few minutes to take some rest.
2. The hens have laid (not lain) no eggs today.
3. The wounded leopard had to lie (not lay) down on the grass.
4. We laid (not lay) the books on the table.
5. He raised (not rose) it up as high as he could above his shoulders.
6. The prisoner was hanged (not hung).
7. He hung (not hanged) the map on the wall.
8. She was awakened (not awoke) by the sound of drums.
9. The river has overflowed (not overflown) its banks.
10. The peon has not yet rung (not rang) the bell.
11. Prices have risen (not rose) high.
12. My patience has been worn (not wore) out.

Miscellaneous Mistakes in English Grammar

Study carefully the following.

ENJOY

Enjoy must be followed by an Object. Thus we cannot say…

We went for a picnic and enjoyed very much.

We must say…

1. We went for a picnic and enjoyed ourselves (or it) very much.

We can, however, say…

1. He enjoys good health.
2. We enjoyed our picnic yesterday.

USED TO is correct in the past.

1. The Egyptians used to preserve the bodies of their dead.
2. Tamil-people used to worship SUN-GOD few centuries back.
3. Japanese used to work for a long hours.

HOPE & EXPECT

TO HOPE refers only to pleasurable expectations or wishes.

1. I hope she will be better soon.
2. We hope we will get our share of property soon.
3. He hopes he will meet her wife tomorrow.

To expect denotes the belief that a thing is probable whether it is desired or not.

1. We expect prices will rise before long.
2. We expect we shall succeed in the long run.

SEE & LOOK AT

TO LOOK at implies attention.
TO SEE does not imply attention.

1. I saw a book on the table.
2. Please look at (not see) this exercise.

LISTEN TO & HEAR

LISTEN TO implies attention.
TO DOES not imply attention.

1. I can hear his voice but not what he is saying.
2. Listen to what I say.

We always say….

To say (not to speak) one's prayers….

Never say….My tooth is paining.

Say….My tooth is aching.

He gave a speech.
They made a goal.

They are incorrect expressions.

We always say…

1. He made a speech.
2. They scored a goal.



Miscellaneous Mistakes in English Grammar :



Miscellaneous Mistakes in English Grammar To HOME PAGE

The Sentences Index