Onomatopoeia : Figure of Speech



Onomatopoeia : Figure of Speech :



This is the name given to that artificial language by which the sound of the words is made to suggest or echo the sense.

Rend with tremendous sound your ears asunder
With gun, drum, trumpet, blunderbuss and thunder

Here the vowel-sounds in the second line suggest an idea of a loud and thundering noise.



A needless Alexandrine ends the song,
Which like a wounded snake drags its slow length along.

An Alexandrine is a line of twelve syllables. The tedious length of the line suggests the slowness of a needless Alexandrine or the slow crawling of a wounded snake.



The tallest pines,
Though rooted deep as high and sturdiest oaks
Bowed their stiff necks, loaded with stormy blasts
Or torn up sheer.
(Milton)

The stiffness of the third line suggests the stiffness with which the trees resisted the storm while lightness of the fourth suggests the suddenness with which a tree is torn up by the roots.



The moan of doves in immemorial elms
And murmuring of innumerable bees.
(Tennyson)



The murmurous haunt of flies on summer eves.
(Keats)



Onomatopoeia : Figure of Speech



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