Prepositions of Time



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Prepositions of Time :



We use AT with a particular time such as a clock time or a meal time.

1. at 5 o’clock
2. at 2.35
3. at lunchtime
4. at lunch
5. at noon
6. at midnight
7. at sunrise
8. at sunset
9. at that time
10. at the moment

We also use AT with short holiday periods.

1. at Christmas

but….on Christmas Day

2. at the weekend

American English….on the weekend

We use ON with a day or date.

1. On Monday
2. on 10th July

We use IN with longer periods (maths, seasons and years).

1. in October
2. in summer
3. in 2011
4. in the morning
5. in the evening
6. in the dining-hall

We also use IN with a part of a day.

1. in the morning
2. in the afternoon
3. in the evening

We say….in the night…but…at night (without “the”).

We use on with a day + a part of the day.

1. on Monday morning
2. on Friday afternoon
3. on Sunday evening
4. On the coming Friday
5. On the forthcoming hoildays

We do not normally use at, on or in with next, last, this and every.

1. The book will come out next month.
2. We saw the exhibition last Sunday.
3. I am very busy this week.
4. We go to Ooty every summer.

We do not put a preposition before “home” when we use a verb of movement.

1. We got home late.
2. The children ran home.

When we talk about position, we say at home.

1. I was at home all day.

Note the use of SINCE and FOR in the perfect tenses as in the following sentences.

1. It has been raining since 9.30.
2. I have known him for six years.

SINCE and FOR are often confused.
We use SINCE to say when something started.
We use FOR to talk about a length of time till now.

1. Since 8 O’clock
2. Since yesterday
3. Since 10th of June
4. Since 2009
5. Since my childhood
6. For four hours
7. For two days
8. For five months
9. For a long time
10. for a period of one month
11. for ages together
12. For ages



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