The Adjective Clause



The Adjective Clause :



An Adjective Clause does the work of an Adjective in relation to some Noun or Pronoun in some other clause. The only kind of connective word by which an Adjective Clause can be introduced is a Relative Pronoun or Relative Adverb and then only when the Relative is used in a Restrictive sense.

If the Relative is used in a Continuative sense, the sentence is Multiple and not Complex.

1. Among the men who came here today, not one turned out to be suitable for the post. [Here the italicized clause qualifies or restricts men]

2. We found the wolf lying dead in the very place where it was shot. (Here the italicised clause qualifies or restricts place.)

3. Uneasy lies the head that wears a crown.

4. The moment which is lost is lost for ever.

The Relative Pronoun or the Relative Adverb, provided it would be in the Accusative Case and provided its sense is Restrictive and not Continuative, is often left out.

1. The food he needed (= which or that he needed) was not procured without a great deal of trouble.

2. He gave me everything I asked for (= which or that I asked for).

3. I am monarch of all I survey (= that I survey).

4. He has a brother I know well (= whom I know well)

5. On the day (when) you get married, you shall have a thousand pounds.

6. The reason (why) she has returned is that she did not get the job.

Here are examples of who (and which) used to introduce Coordinate Clauses.

1. I met Mr. John, who (= and he) told me about your illness. [Here the Clause who told me about your illness is not an Adjective Clause, as it does not in any way identify or describe Mr. John. It is a Coordinate Clause.]

2. He was brought before the King, who (= and he) at once condemned him to death.

3. He gave me a picture, which (= and it) is hanging in my study.

4. He told me a secret which (= but this) I must not reveal.

Adjective Clause may also be introduced by as after such and same.

1. He was wearing the same suit as he had on when I last saw him.

2. We are such stuff as dreams are made of.

Sometimes an Adjective Clause is introduced by BUT where it is equivalent to a Relative Pronoun followed by NOT.

1. There was not a man present but wept to hear such sad news. [That is, who did not weep to hear such sad news.]

2. There was not a boy of the five hundred but loved and honoured him. [That is, who did not love and honour him.]

  • Sample Sentences with Adjective Clause

    RELATED PAGES :



    1. The Adjective
    2. An Adjective
    3. Attribute Position of Adjective
    4. Predicative Position of Adjective
    5. Kinds of Adjectives
    6. Proper Adjectives
    7. Descriptive Adjectives
    8. Quantitative Adjectives ( Adjectives of Quantity )
    9. Qualitative Adjectives ( Adjectives of Quality )
    10. Numeral Adjectives ( Adjectives of Number )
    11. Definite Numeral Adjectives
    12. Indefinite Numeral Adjectives
    13. Demonstrative Adjectives ( Demonstrative Adjective )
    14. Definite Demonstrative Adjectives
    15. Definite Demonstratives
    16. Indefinite Demonstrative Adjectives
    17. Indefinite Demonstratives
    18. Distributive Adjectives
    19. Interrogative Adjectives
    20. Exclamatory Adjectives
    21. Possessive Adjectives
    22. Possessive Determiners
    23. First Person Possessive Adjectives
    24. Second Person Possessive Adjectives
    25. Third Person Possessive Adjectives
    26. Emphasizing Adjectives
    27. Coordinate Adjectives
    28. Paired Adjectives
    29. Cumulative Adjectives
    30. Non-Coordinate Adjectives
    31. Two Uses of Adjectives
    32. Attributive Use of Adjectives
    33. Predicative Use of Adjectives
    34. The Degrees of Comparison
    35. Comparison of Adjectives
    36. Latin Comparatives of Adjectives
    37. Irregular Comparisons of Adjectives
    38. Formation of Comparatives and Superlatives
    39. Formation of Comparative and Superlative
    40. Uses of Quantitative Adjectives
    41. Uses of Numeral Adjectives
    42. Definite Numeral Quantities
    43. Uses of Demonstrative Adjectives
    44. Uses of Distributive Phrases
    45. Uses of Distributive Adjectives
    46. Example Sentences with suitable Adjectives
    47. Uses of Degrees of Comparison of Adjectives
    48. Uses of Positive Degree of Comparison of Adjectives
    49. Uses of Comparative Degree of Comparison of Adjectives
    50. Uses of Superlative Degree of Comparison of Adjectives
    51. Use of The Comparative Degree
    52. OTHER after Positives and Comparatives
    53. Preferables in English Grammar
    54. Double Comparatives
    55. Double Superlatives
    56. Comparatives which have lost their force
    57. Latin Comparatives
    58. English Comparatives
    59. Adjectives used as Nouns
    60. Adjectives in Pairs
    61. Adjectives preceded by THE
    62. Position of Adjectives
    63. Adjectives Used Attributively
    64. Adjectives Used Predicatively


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