The Adverb



The Adverb :



An Adverb usually qualifies a Verb, an Adjective, another Adverb or a Preposition.

Qualifying The Verbs :

1. He did not run badly.
2. She has grown tall.
3. His life finished so quickly.
4. The singer sings loudly.

Qualifying The Adjectives :

1. That lady is quite pretty.
2. This man is more interesting than his brother.
3. Your report is always right.
4. He is always fast in his walk.
5. You are the most talented students.

Qualifying The Adverbs :

1. SPB and his team sing enormously too loudly.
2. They run quite fast.

Qualifying The Prepositions :

1. The bird flew exactly over the sleeper's head.
2. He paid the money right up to date.
3. This mistake was made entirely through your fault.
4. He arrived long before the time.
5. They committed a mistake simply out of innocence.
6. You have to face him squarely in front of you.

An Adverb can qualify not merely individual words, but an entire Assertive Sentence. In this case it must stand first in the sentence.

1. Unfortunately the thief was not caught.
2. Evidently you were much distressed at the news.
3. Luckily he got the money from his father in time.
4. Inadvertently they failed to send their documents today.

We could rewrite these sentences in the following forms.

1. It is unfortunate that the thief was not caught.
2. It is evident that you were much distressed at the news.
3. It is mere luck that he got the money from his father in time.
4. It is inadvertent that they failed to send their documents today.

As a general rule Adverbs do not qualify Nouns or Pronouns. This is the work of Adjectives.

But an Adverb qualifies a Noun in such a sentence (Even torture could not break his spirit.) and a Pronoun in (Only you can tell us the facts.)

Qualifying The Nouns :

1. There is a high mountain is beyond this town.
2. My parents gave a real surprise.
3. There is a fast train to your native after 8 pm today.

Qualifying The Pronouns :

4. It is a high mountain beyond this town.
5. They gave a real surprise.
6. It is a fast train to your native after 8 pm today.

In the following examples Adverb that precedes the Noun does not qualify the Noun, but some Participle or Adjective understood.

1. The then king = the king then reigning.
2. The above account = the account given above.

In the following example, an Adverb ALMOST does not qualify the Noun drunkard, but the Verb IS.

1. He is almost a drunkard.

To say….He is an almost drunkard…would be incorrect.

RELATED PAGES :



  1. The Adverb
  2. Adverbs
  3. An Adverb
  4. The Adverb Clause
  5. The Kinds of Adverbs
  6. Simple Adverbs
  7. Interrogative Adverbs
  8. Relative Adverbs
  9. Relative Adverb of Quantity
  10. Demonstrative Adverb of Quantity
  11. Degrees of Comparison in Adverbs
  12. Adverbs ending in LY
  13. LY Words That are not Adverbs
  14. LY Imposters
  15. The Forms of Adverbs
  16. Adverb Phrases
  17. The Two Uses of Adverbs
  18. Attributive Use of Adverbs
  19. Predicative Use of Adverbs
  20. Adverbial Adjuncts to Verb of Predicate
  21. The Adverb
  22. Relative Adverbs


    1. The Adverb
    2. Adverbs
    3. An Adverb
    4. The Adverb Clause
    5. The Kinds of Adverbs
    6. Simple Adverbs
    7. Interrogative Adverbs
    8. Relative Adverbs
    9. Relative Adverb of Quantity
    10. Demonstrative Adverb of Quantity
    11. Degrees of Comparison in Adverbs
    12. Adverbs ending in LY
    13. LY Words That are not Adverbs
    14. LY Imposters
    15. The Forms of Adverbs
    16. Adverb Phrases
    17. The Two Uses of Adverbs
    18. Attributive Use of Adverbs
    19. Predicative Use of Adverbs
    20. Adverbial Adjuncts to Verb of Predicate
    21. The Adverb
    22. Relative Adverbs


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