The Case of A Noun



The Case of A Noun :



A nominative is the particular form of a noun which shows that the noun is the subject of a verb.

An accusative is the particular form of a noun which shows that the noun is the direct object of a verb.

A genitive is the particular form of a noun which shows that the noun is a possessor or an origin.

When a noun is used as the Subject of a verb, it is in the Nominative case.

When a noun is used as the object of a verb, it is in the Accusative (objective) case.

The test of nominative is the test of object. Put who / what before the verb and if the answer is the subject, it is in the nominative.

The test of the accusative is the test of object put whom / what after the verb and if the answer is the object it is in the accusative.

A noun which comes after a preposition is also in the accusative case.

The possessive case also denotes authorship, origin, kind etc.

(i) John studied English Grammar.

John - Proper noun - Subject of the verb studied
Nominative case
Who studied grammar?

English Grammar — Common Noun
Object of studied
Objective case
What did John study?

(ii) She is Singh's wife.

Singh's - Proper noun
Possessive case
Singh s wife — Complement of 'is'

(iii) The Court's decree is that I should pay one thousand rupees.

Court's - Possessive case
(but here, it gives definite origin to the decree)

The Case of A Noun



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