The Intensive Forms of
English Verbs



The Intensive Forms of English Verbs :



This form is used for emphasis and is also a key to negation in English and for asking questions.

The Present Intensive (Pres, lnt.) emphasizes that an action can or does take place.

The Present Intensive Active is formed by combining the auxiliary form do or does with the basic form.

1. I do accept your conditions.
2. We do accept your conditions.
3. You do accept your conditions.
4. They do accept your conditions.
5. He does want to come. But she does not want to come.

The Present Intensive Passive combines do get or does get with the past participle.

1. I do get appreciated.
2. We do get appreciated.
3. You do get appreciated.
4. They do get appreciated.
5. He does get presented a variety of views.
6. She does get presented a variety of views.

The Future (Fut.) of a verb indicates an action or state that does not yet exist. Strictly speaking, it is not a separate tense in modem English.

The Future Active is a compound formed with the help of the auxiliary verb will (or shall) and sometimes contracted as ’ll followed by the basic form of the verb.

In the spoken language future time is often indicated by am, are, is going to and the basic form of the verb.

1. I will survive.
2. She will survive.
3. He will survive.
4. It will survive.
5. We will survive.
6. You will survive.
7. They will survive.

The Future Passive is formed by combining will be and the past participle.

1. I will be discovered.
2. He will be discovered.
3. She will be discovered.
4. It will be discovered.
5. We will be discovered.
6. You will be discovered.
7. They will be discovered.

In the latest English grammar texts there is no mention of the intensive or emphatic as a separate category. The auxiliary verb DO is called a dummy operator when used to form negations and questions. Because these DO forms are so essential. We have followed the convention of Hopper, English Verb Conjugations, and provided the present and the past intensive for each verb.

We have consistently used will as the auxiliary verb for the future. Traditionally school children were taught to use SHALL for the first person singular and plurals to indicate simple future.

1. I shall come.
2. We shall overcome.

I WILL and WE WILL were to be used for special emphasis. Similarly we were taught to write “he, she, it, you, they will” unless we wished to emphasize the statement with “she, he, it, you, they shall.” The distinction was then and probably for the entire twentieth century very artificial. Recent research has indicated that this rule was rarely ever observed in actual practice and in modern standard American English SHALL is rarely used except in legal documents and in some specific phrases.

1. We shall overcome.
2. Shall we dance?

One should, however, be aware of the historical distinction and recognize SHALL for the first person singular and plural and in questions and some formulaic statements.

The Past tense describes some action or mood that occurred or existed prior to or before the moment of speech or writing.

The Past Active form of regular verbs is formed for all three persons, singular and plural, by adding “d,” “ed,” or “d.”

First we provide the most common forms.

After a vowel the letter “d” is added.

1. He closed.
2. He continued.
3. He decided.

After a consonant the letters “ed” are added.

1. She worked.
2. She opened.
3. She passed.
4. She packed.

When a “y” comes after a consonant, it changes to “i” before the ending “ed.”

1. He cried.
2. He tried.
3. He carried.
4. He married.

There are cases where the general rule requires some modification.

Verbs that end with a “c” sometimes have an added “k” before the “ed” ending.

She panicked, because he trafficked in drugs.

Sometimes a word’s final consonant is doubled - when it is spelled with a single letter and the vowel before it is stressed-before adding “ed.”

In words of a single syllable this is always the case.

1. He begged.
2. He gunned.
3. He stopped.

American English differs from British English in verbs ending in a single “l” or “p.” American English permits a single final consonant.

1. She traveled (travelled).
2. He worshiped (worshipped).

American English also accepts a single “m” for the past tense of verbs ending in “m”:

1. She programed.
2. She programmed.

After some final vowels the letters "ed" are added.

1. She echoed.
2. She radioed.
3. She taxied.

After some final vowel sounds an “d” is added.

She FTP'd, IM'd.

The Past Passive form combines was or were and the past participle.

1. I was added at the last moment.
2. He was added at the last moment.
3. She was added at the last moment.
4. It was added at the last moment.
5. We were all added later.
6. You were all added later.
7. They were all added later.

The Past Progressive (Past Prog.) indicates an action that was proceeding in the past.

The Past Progressive Active combines WAS or WERE with the present participle.

1. I was riding in a car.
2. He was riding in a car.
3. She was riding in a car.
4. It was riding in a car.
5. We were keeping tabs.
6. You were keeping tabs.
7. They were keeping tabs.

The Past Progressive Passive combines WAS BEING or WERE BEING with the past participle.

1. I was being improved.
2. She was being improved.
3. He was being improved.
4. It was being improved.
5. We were being preserved.
6. You were being preserved.
7. They were being preserved.

The Past Intensive emphasizes that an action did take place in the past. It is also used for negation and questions in the past.

The Past Intensive Active combines did (the past tense of do) with the basic form of the verb.

1. I did complete the assignment.
2. She did not stop to smell the roses.
3. Did we hear you correctly?
4. You and they did do the exercises.

The Past Intensive Passive combines did get and the past participle.

1. I did get recognized.
2. It did not get removed.
3. Did we get called last evening?
4. You and they did not get summoned.

RELATED PAGES :

  1. The Verb
  2. The Auxiliary Verbs
  3. Subject-Verb Agreement - 1
  4. Subject-Verb Agreement - 2
  5. The English Verb
  6. Basic Form of The Verb
  7. Principal Parts of A Verb
  8. Non-finite Form of The Verb
  9. The Intensive Forms of English Verbs
  10. Verbal Idioms
  11. Confusing Verbs
  12. Agreement of The Verb with The Subject
  13. Sentences with Agreement of The Verb with The Subject
  14. Two Auxiliaries with One Principal Verb
  15. One Auxiliary with Two Principal Verbs
  16. Words Used as Verbs
  17. Intransitive Verb of Complete Predication
  18. Intransitive Verb of Incomplete Predication
  19. Defective Verbs
  20. Strong Verbs
  21. Tests of A Strong Verb
  22. Wholly Strong Strong Verbs
  23. Partly Strong Strong Verbs
  24. List of Strong Verbs
  25. Weak Verbs
  26. Tests of A Weak Verb
  27. List of Weak Verbs
  28. Mixed Verbs
  29. Strong Verbs Becoming Partly Weak Verbs


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