The Present Tense



The Present Tense :



The Present Active for the first person singular and plural, second person singular and plural and the third person plural is the basic form.

The Present Active for the third person singular (he, she, it) is normally formed by adding “s” after most consonants and all silent vowels.

After the combinations of “ss,” “zz,” “ch,” “sh,” “x” or after a vowel that is pronounced, we add “es.” When a verb ends in “y” after a consonant, the “y” changes to an “i” and is followed by “es.”

I promise to try if he tries.
The third person singular form requires an “s.”
When a verb ends in “y” after a consonant, the “y” changes to an “i” and is followed by “es.”

She asks a lot of questions.
Why don’t you ask one?
The second person singular and plural use the basic form.

I promise to begin as soon as Mom begins.
The third person singular (he, she, it) is normally formed by adding “s” after most consonants.

Do you believe what your father believes?
The third person singular is normally formed by adding “s” after silent vowels.

To win, you must bid more than the other person bids.
Add “s” after most consonants.

If one side decides to sue, the other side automatically sues.
Add “s” after silent vowels.

Who dares to enter where even angels dare not go?
The third person plural is the basic form.

I never seem to dream. But my daughter dreams all the time.
Add “s” after most consonants.

I never drink alcohol when my dinner companion drinks.
Add “s” after most consonants.

Do you see what I see?
The first person singular is the basic form.

I rarely guess at the answers, but my brother often guesses correctly.
After the combination of “ss,” add “es.”

He catches fish for a living. I never catch anything.
The first person singular is the basic form.

If no one establishes the rules of the game, who establishes the winner?
After the combination “sh,” add “es.”

I don’t cry often, but there are times when a man cries.
When a verb ends in “y” after a consonant, the “y” changes to an “i” and is followed by “es.”

They told us to radio for help, but the captain never radios without good reason.
This is an exception to the rule.
Here the ending “s” is applied after two vowels that are pronounced.

I want to go to the movies tonight. But my sister never goes.
After a vowel that is pronounced normally, add “es.”

Since everyone is pushing back and forth, it’s hard to know who pushes whom.
After the combinations “sh,” add “es.”

I would like to learn how to Google a word definition.
Steve Googles all the time.
Add “s” after silent vowels.

My computer crashes about once a week.
They say that the new computers no longer crash so frequently.
The third person plural is the basic form.

You can always fax me the proposal.
No one faxes such an important document.
After “x” add “es.”

I ski every day.
But my sister skis only on weekends.
This is an exception to the rule.
Here the ending “s" is applied after a single vowel that is pronounced.

When you do the laundry, Mom does the dishes.
After a vowel that is pronounced normally add “es.”

I miss my family.
My family misses me.
After the combination of “ss," add “es."

We play for fun.
The professional golfer plays for money.
Add “s” after consonants.
Remember that “y” is a consonant.

When I lie in my bed, the dog lies on the floor.
Here the ending “s” is applied after a silent vowel.

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The Present Tense